Painting: A Tip Sheet for Your Next Project

October 13th, 2010 | Posted by cramcharran in Environment | Green Products

For many of us, the feeling of a new year beginning is stronger in the fall than at New Year’s. This is when we make those home repairs we didn’t get to during the busy summer, crack down on those organizing projects we’ve been putting off, and give things a fresh coat of paint—sort of like a second round of spring cleaning, if we ever did it in the spring to begin with! Something about the kids going back to school inspires the rest of us to get going too.

With that in mind, here’s a tip sheet for your next paint job. Thought it might be tempting to just grab a brush and bucket and jump in, any paint job will be easier with a little preparation and planning. The first step, of course, is choosing your paint. And as you probably already know, low-VOC or zero-VOC paint is not only the healthier choice, but it’s better for the environment, too.

Green Depot carries a whopping four lines of zero-VOC paint: Ivy Coatings (proudly made in our hometown, NYC), Yolo Colorhouse, AFM Safecoat®, and Ana Sova Food Paint. With the Ivy Coatings and AFM Safecoat paints, we have the capability to match any color from any brand line—and our tinting pigments are zero-VOC too, so even the wildest custom colors remain zero-VOC.

These paints don’t contain any of the harmful components found in conventional paints, so the application process might differ.  Here are three useful tips that will help ensure durability and performance without compromising the air you breathe:

  1. Don’t apply water-based paint on cold, damp days or if your surface, container or air temperature is below 55 degrees.
  2. Get to know your equipment—read the instructions, if there are any. The better you understand your equipment and how it works, the more satisfied you’ll be with the application process. Countless types of brushes, rollers and sprayers are available for different kinds of jobs, and each kind is best used in a particular way. It’s worth it to figure out what are the right tools for your situation, and how to use them properly.
  3. Fifty percent of any good paint job is surface preparation, so be sure you know what you’re painting.  What is it made of?  Is it porous? What type of paint is on it now, if any—is it oil- or water-based?  And different surfaces require different techniques, so below are some examples regarding specific conditions:

Transitioning from oil-based to water-based paint

  • Sand the surface before any water-based coating, to promote adhesion.
  • If you’d rather not sand, use a transitional primer like this one from Safecoat.  When applied to a clean surface, it will both stick to the oil-based paint and accept the water-based coating on top.

Painting Wood Surfaces

  • Different woods react differently to water-base coating.  Variables to consider include the density of the wood, and whether it has an existing finish that will make surface preparation necessary before painting. Completely unfinished wood usually needs a coat of primer, whereas previously painted or stained wood often receives paint better if you sand it lightly first.
  • Consider the moisture level of the wood. Making sure the wood is fully dry can help avoid problems with the paint not sticking.
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